Hadas Kress-Gazit

I chose to work in robotics because of their potential impact

Hadas Kress-Gazit

I began my career working on chip verification at IBM in Israel where I learned techniques I currently use in my research, like formal methods and model checking. From there I went to the University of Pennsylvania, where I received my Ph.D. in Electrical and Systems Engineering in 2008 and worked as a research scientist at GRASP lab developing methods to create robot controllers guaranteed to satisfy high level tasks.

I joined Cornell's Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering faculty in 2009 as an Assistant Professor. My current research focuses on formal methods for robotics and automation and more specifically on creating verifiable robot controllers for complex high-level tasks using logic, verification methods, synthesis, hybrid systems theory and computational linguistics. I received an NSF CAREER award in 2010 and am part of a five-year, $10 million National Science Foundation Expeditions in Computing project to make computer programming faster, easier and more intuitive.

I chose to work in robotics because of their potential impact. I think robots can contribute to society in many different areas, from disaster relief to space exploration to personal robots. But we still don't know how to make them safe, useful, and versatile.